Fossil site records immediate aftermath of dinosaur-killing meteorite impact.

Moderator: Deku Tree

Post Reply
User avatar
Valigarmander
Supermod
Posts: 50216
Joined: Thu Jun 01, 2006 8:22 pm
Location: World -1
Has thanked: 108 times
Been thanked: 433 times
Contact:

Fossil site records immediate aftermath of dinosaur-killing meteorite impact.

#1

Post by Valigarmander » Sun Mar 31, 2019 12:20 am

The 66-million-year-old fossil bed was laid down within hours of the fatal impact.
The beginning of the end started with violent shaking that raised giant waves in the waters of an inland sea in what is now North Dakota.

Then, tiny glass beads began to fall like birdshot from the heavens. The rain of glass was so heavy it may have set fire to much of the vegetation on land. In the water, fish struggled to breathe as the beads clogged their gills.

The heaving sea turned into a 30-foot wall of water when it reached the mouth of a river, tossing hundreds, if not thousands, of fresh-water fish -- sturgeon and paddlefish -- onto a sand bar and temporarily reversing the flow of the river. Stranded by the receding water, the fish were pelted by glass beads up to 5 millimeters in diameter, some burying themselves inches deep in the mud. The torrent of rocks, like fine sand, and small glass beads continued for another 10 to 20 minutes before a second large wave inundated the shore and covered the fish with gravel, sand and fine sediment, sealing them from the world for 66 million years.

This unique, fossilized graveyard -- fish stacked one atop another and mixed in with burned tree trunks, conifer branches, dead mammals, mosasaur bones, insects, the partial carcass of a Triceratops, marine microorganisms called dinoflagellates and snail-like marine cephalopods called ammonites -- was unearthed by paleontologist Robert DePalma over the past six years in the Hell Creek Formation, not far from Bowman, North Dakota. The evidence confirms a suspicion that nagged at DePalma in his first digging season during the summer of 2013 -- that this was a killing field laid down soon after the asteroid impact that eventually led to the extinction of all ground-dwelling dinosaurs. The impact at the end of the Cretaceous Period, the so-called K-T boundary, exterminated 75 percent of life on Earth.

"This is the first mass death assemblage of large organisms anyone has found associated with the K-T boundary," said DePalma, curator of paleontology at the Palm Beach Museum of Natural History in Florida and a doctoral student at the University of Kansas. "At no other K-T boundary section on Earth can you find such a collection consisting of a large number of species representing different ages of organisms and different stages of life, all of which died at the same time, on the same day."

In a paper to appear next week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, he and his American and European colleagues, including two University of California, Berkeley, geologists, describe the site, dubbed Tanis, and the evidence connecting it with the asteroid or comet strike off Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula 66 million years ago. That impact created a huge crater, called Chicxulub, in the ocean floor and sent vaporized rock and cubic miles of asteroid dust into the atmosphere. The cloud eventually enveloped Earth, setting the stage for Earth's last mass extinction.

"It's like a museum of the end of the Cretaceous in a layer a meter-and-a-half thick," said Mark Richards, a UC Berkeley professor emeritus of earth and planetary science who is now provost and professor of earth and space sciences at the University of Washington.

Richards and Walter Alvarez, a UC Berkeley Professor of the Graduate School who 40 years ago first hypothesized that a comet or asteroid impact caused the mass extinction, were called in by DePalma and Dutch scientist Jan Smit to consult on the rain of glass beads and the tsunami-like waves that buried and preserved the fish. The beads, called tektites, formed in the atmosphere from rock melted by the impact.
This is an incredible find.

User avatar
Deku Tree
Moderator
Posts: 12202
Joined: Tue Jun 13, 2000 1:00 am
Location: Texas
Has thanked: 47 times
Been thanked: 27 times

Re: Fossil site records immediate aftermath of dinosaur-killing meteorite impact.

#2

Post by Deku Tree » Sun Mar 31, 2019 12:42 am

Very cool

User avatar
CaptHayfever
Supermod
Posts: 37632
Joined: Tue Jul 16, 2002 1:00 am
Location: (n) - the place where I am
Has thanked: 284 times
Been thanked: 70 times
Contact:

Re: Fossil site records immediate aftermath of dinosaur-killing meteorite impact.

#3

Post by CaptHayfever » Sun Mar 31, 2019 12:54 am

This is awesome.

And remember, "I'm-a Luigi, number one!"

Post Reply

Return to “Current Events”